Make a Pledge for Earth Day

By Hannah Gartner

With Earth Day tomorrow, now is a great time to make a pledge to improve the natural world. Small or large, there are many day to day changes that can be made which help reduce ones carbon footprint and increases the sustainability.

Pale Blue Dot copySource: National Geographic – This photo, titled “The Blue Marble”, was the first photo of Earth taken in its entirety. It was taken in 1972, two years after the first Earth Day.

Here are a few more simple pledges that can be made:

  • Stop eating cattle, pork, and sheep; take it a step further by cutting meat consumption to two or three times a week.
  • Start a compost pile, its easy and doesn’t take up that much space. Directions can be found here.
  • Commit to purging your life of disposable plastic.
  • Instead of buying new clothes go to the thrift shop or exchange clothes with your friends.
  • Volunteer for trash pickups, trail maintenance, or at your local garden.

Earth Day Vollunteers copySource: Politico

The more one gets to know nature the more they care for it, so the most fun pledge one can make is to spend more time exploring and learning about the Earth. Here are some ideas:

  • Go for a hike every month this year.
  • Plan the first annual family camping trip.
  • Go on science walks were you identify and catalogue the flora and fauna.
  • Take a trip to wide open spaces and spend the night identifying the stars.

Understanding is often the first step to change. Anything that fosters connection and caring for the natural world also helps it and can be a pledge.

800px-Crepuscular_rays_in_the_woods_of_Kasterlee,_BelgiumWhile we make these small changes in our lives, it is important to remember that systemic change is also needed. All over the world there are individuals, groups, and organizations working on the creating the changes that solve the large problems. Pay attention and support these activities whenever possible. One example is The Leap Manifesto, written by a wide array of activist groups, which tackles a huge portion of Canada’s environmental and social problems at once. Read it here and join the 39,000 who have signed it.

Gamiing Logo copy

This Saturday, April 23rd, The Gamiing Nature Center will be holding an event where everyone will be making there own pledge. These pledges will all be displayed on the wall as a symbol of our promise to help create a healthier Earth. More information on the event can be found here. Start thinking about your own pledge and we hope to see you on Saturday.

Year in Review

By Gamiing Nature Centre

Hi everyone, hope you are all doing great! Well, another year has come to an end, and with that it is inevitable to not think about all the achievements that we have conquered and all the goals that we plan for the year to come.

2015 was a special year for Gamiing and the blog. We have two new blog contributors, Hannah and Pooja, who are delighting our readers with their articles. We have initiated the development of an educational trail in our landscape and also promoted many events to bring the community. I could go on and on…

United Nations also posted a video showcasing the year in review. Many of the topics in the video were covered by our blog and also proactively tackled by Gamiing Nature Centre such as the refugee crises.

Happy New Year to everyone!!!

Syrian refugee crisis: a call to compassion

By Pooja Mishra

 
Note: This article was written before Paris attacks. It is important to have in mind that the refugees are running away precisely from those attackers. Pray for Paris!

 
What do you do when your house gets assaulted as part of a widespread destruction? You run right, without thinking what are you leaving behind, what you want to take with you except your children, where you will go or what you will do. At that moment all that matters is the safety of you and your family.

 
And, from here another chapter of life starts. We have seen this situation with millions of Syrian refugees who have been dealing with such hard insupportable conditions since March 2011. The conflict that had begun with anti-government protests is now a full-blown bloody war.


The hard winter is on its way and Syrian refugee crisis is getting worse day by day. Millions of Syrian’s are fleeing from deadly civil war. More than 12 million Syrians have fled their homes in four-and- half years of conflict.
They have very limited basic resources to sustain their lives. They don’t have clean water to drink, no sanitation facilities. They need food, warm cloths, blankets, heaters and shelter to survive in this cold winter. Every day thousands refugees try to cross border; most of them are women and children.

 
Children, who are a nation’s hope for a better future, have lost their families, their loved ones, witnessed violence and cruelty. At an age where they should play, get education, dream for their future; they are dealing with disease, malnutrition, sexual abuse, exploitation.
It’s time to come along and help all the souls, who have nothing left except homelessness, limited clothes on their body and void dreams, and provide them with basic needs and accept them with open heart.

 

A Growing Storm

By Hannah Gartner

Source NASAOn October 23rd
Hurricane Patricia made landfall on Mexico’s Pacific coast. Thishurricane, which was the strongest ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere, narrowly missed causing severe damage despite reaching wind speeds of 200 mph. A week later no deaths have been reported and the damage is limited to flooding and mudslides within rural Mexico. This is due to a few factors, namely the fact that Patricia avoided a direct hit to more populated areas such as Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo, and that once on land it lost power very quickly. An excellent response from the government also made a huge difference in mitigating the damage.

This storm is just the latest to be added to the list of record shattering weather events. Although the research is ongoing, there is indication that global warming will cause an increase in storms to this caliber. Last August The Weather Channel published a list of the top ten most powerful hurricanes to ever occur within the Atlantic. Five of these storms have taken place since 2000, and only two occurred before 1950. It seems that the intensity of storms is on an upward trend. Some climate scientists even predict that we will have a storm on the level of Hurricane Katrina every two years.

Source Boston.comOther natural phenomena are also on the rise due to global warming. California is currently entering its forth year of draught and has been consistently recording its highest on average temperatures. On the other end of the spectrum, the record shattering snow in New England last winter has been attributed the disruption of the Arctic polar vortex which is occurring through global warming. These two examples only scratch the surface of the many instances of changing weather.

After Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in 2013, Yeb Sano, the country’s climate change representative, said the following words in front of the United Nations: “We can take drastic action now to ensure that we prevent a future where super typhoons become a way of life.” After seeing his country destroyed by this storm he knew he had experienced climate change first hand. Action must be taken to slow down, stop, and reverse the degradation of the natural world or these storms will become the norm. We cannot count on the luck that Mexico received last week. There is hope, but only if business does not continue as usual.

Listen, Talk and Understand

By Pooja Mishra

Heavy rainfalls and a large amount of debris precipitated a muddy flood in Southern California last week on October 16th. Hundreds of people were trapped and stuck in their homes, cars. While many of them have been rescued, the rescue efforts are still ongoing.
Similar torrential rains had struck South Carolina on October 4, 2015. The flood had caused damage to many shelters. The whole South Carolina was gripped by floodwater. According to the National Weather Service, that day was the wettest day in the history of Southern Carolina.

 
The weather pattern is not a local phenomenon. 11 people died and 65,000 villagers left their home as a typhoon battered northern Philippines on October 18, 2015. It is a scary though that these floods might be just a preview of what is coming in near futureSource Luis Sinco and Los Angeles Times“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better”
These words of Albert Einstein say everything about life. It describes the connection of a man with nature. Nature has all the answers to your questions; whether these are related to you, your life, your relations or your work. All we need to do is listen, talk to and understand it.

 
Everybody loves to get out into the nature and feel the real charm of life. Living in Canada, I am fortunate to have so much beauty and splendor of nature all around me. The autumn season is here. The crisp and cool breeze makes us feel the summer is gone and fall is in the air. In Canada, autumn is the third season of the year. It is the time when leaves start to turn in different color red, yellow, orange and brown. It is amazing, an awesome creation of God. The glory of nature mesmerizes one and all. We forget everything in the lap of nature and just enjoy the pleasure of being there.

 
Nature is derived from the Latin word Natura, which means birth. It has its own way of existence and the mountains, beeches, hills, forest, rivers, sunrise, sunset, flowers, clouds in the sky, various season and so on together make an incredible spectacle. It is a privilege being surrounded by these. But as the saying goes, every privilege comes with some responsibilities.

 
Ed Begley Jr once said, “I don’t understand why when we destroy something created by man we call it vandalism, but when we destroy something by nature we call it progress.”
Every time we build a new house, new road, parking space or even a concrete over a garden we astray ourselves to think that we are making the world a better place to live in. The natural resources are not infinite. They are limited and the way we are using it, that day is not far when we will have nothing to pass on to our future generations.
These days’ floods are the most frequent natural disaster worldwide. Recent splurge in population and the changes in land use patterns are the main causes of flood.
We are constantly cutting down trees and plants for our daily needs. One and a half acres of forest is cut down every second and agriculture is the leading cause of deforestation. We get wooden furniture, decorative items for the interior of our house and offices but we do not realize that we are cutting our own feet by making wood from trees and plants. If the current rate of deforestation continues, it will take less than 100 years to destroy all the rainforest on the earth. Cutting of trees can be avoided if we cut down our materialistic needs and shift our focus in different direction.

Source National Bank and Nature Conservancy
According to The World Counts, 13 million hectares of forest have been converted for other uses or destroy by natural causes. We cannot deny the fact that our environment is constantly changing. Global warming is slowly becoming a more daunting threat with each passing day. Our environment is warming up and we are definitely responsible for it. Since the industrial revolution and the large scale of burning fossil fuels has increased the amount of heat in the atmosphere has also increased by 40 per cent.

 
All across the world people are facing different kind of environmental problems every day. Some of them are small and localized. Whenever a natural calamity hits a particular area, we talk about it for a few days, feel miserable and then forget. We never think that somewhere we are also responsible for that. We are making this earth not habitable by neglecting the nature and its requirements. From time to time nature warns us in many ways; we need to listen to it and make some changes before we reach a point where we won’t have anything left except regret.

 
As human, the earth is our home. This is the place where we live, eat, enjoy, raise our children and dream for their healthy, safe and beautiful future. Our entire life is dependent on the well-being of earth, environment and all the species. It is the home of all natural beauty that we praise. But the relationship with nature is not a one sided relationship. We need to form a closer bond with nature, we have to live within it to understand and feel it; not only for the betterment of our life but the lives of our future generations.

Sounds under the Stars!

By Gamiing Nature Centre

Fall has officially arrived in the Northern hemisphere on September 23th at 4:21am ET. And in the Southern hemisphere, spring has just begun.  To celebrate the beginning of the fall season, we will host our last “Sounds under Stars” summer series this Saturday, September 26th.

Sounds under the stars

Misto Restaurant in Lindsay (155 St. David Street) will be offering a special menu that evening for those coming to the Hayloft for “Sounds under the Stars”.

Come and join us for “Sounds under Stars” on September 26 at 7:30pm at the Hayloft, 1884 Pigeon lake Road, between Bobcaygeon and Lindsay.

Summer Catch Up!

By Marcelo Kawanami

Hi everyone! Hope you are all enjoying the summer. I’m currently in South America and here it is very cold. I wanted to post some updates on Gamiing Nature Centre. On June 20th we had our annual Summer Lakeshore Festival. The weather really helped and we prepared workshops regarding birds of prey, developed interactive exhibits, and much more. You can check some of the photos from the Festival at our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/gamiing

birds of prey

We also had School Field Trips at Gamiing for our outdoor education program. Bowmanville and Lady Eaton School visited us in June for a day of outdoor activities combined with environmental education. If you would like to know more about our School Field Trips, please visit our website: http://www.gamiing.org/School_Field_Trips.php

Don’t be Sorry! Make a Change!

By Mieke Schipper and Marcelo Kawanami

Activist and spoken word artist Prince Ea has released his newest video, “Dear Future Generations: Sorry,” to urge young people to take immediate action to stop climate change. His previous videos have become viral sensations and his latest is no different. It was released on April 20 to coincide with Earth Day and garnered 28 million views on Facebook in the first two days. If you haven’t seen the video yet, please check it below.

Like the video says, let’s not accept this future because an error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it. This is a powerful quote, so don’t be sorry.

Earth Day Every day!

By Marcelo Kawanami

Yesterday, Gamiing hosted its annual Earth Day event where participants from all ages had the chance to learn about the importance of nature through interactive and fun games!
Earth Day official day is actually April 22. And do you know the origin of this date? On April 22, 1970, millions of people took to the streets for ’60s-style demonstrations and marches, calling attention to the perilous pollution of America’s land, air and water. Ten thousand flocked to the Washington Monument for a folk music concert featuring Pete Seeger and U.S. Sen. Edmund Muskie.

From this date, Earth Day is celebrated on April 22 and it became a global event with over 1 billion participants from 192 countries. Earth Day events will be held throughout the week. You can check all events at the Earth Day Network site: http://www.earthday.org/greencities/events/

Winterlude 2015!

By Marcelo Kawanami

Hi everyone! Winterlude at Gamiing Nature Centre is right around the corner! It will be hosted on February 16th, 2015 from 11am to 4pm at Gamiing’s facilities. So bundle up and head down to Winterlude 2015 for a fun afternoon full of outdoor activities!

Winterlude 2015